Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Kings from Greek Mythology

Kings
Abas, a king of Argos
Acastus, a king of Iolcus who sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt
Acrisius, a king of Argos
Actaeus, first king of Attica
Admetus (Άδμητος), a king of Pherae who sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt
Adrastus (Άδραστος), a king of Argos and one of the Seven Against Thebes
Aeacus (Αιακός), a king of the island of Aegina in the Saronic Gulf; after he died, he became one of the three judges of the dead in the Underworld
Aeëtes, a king of Colchis and father of Medea
Aegeus (Αιγεύς), a king of Athens and father of Theseus
Aegimius, a king of Thessaly and progenitor of the Dorians
Aegisthus (Αίγισθος), lover of Clytemnestra, with whom he plotted to murder Agamemnon and seized the kingship of Mycenae
Aegyptus (Αίγυπτος), a king of Egypt
Aeson, father of Jason and rightful king of Iolcus, whose throne was usurped by his half-brother Pelias
Aëthlius, first king of Elis
Aetolus (Αιτωλός), a king of Elis
Agamemnon (Ἀγαμέμνων), a king of Mycenae and commander of the Greek armies during the Trojan War
Agasthenes, a king of Elis
Agenor (Αγήνωρ), a king of Phoenicia
Alcinous (Αλκίνους or Ἀλκίνοος), a king of Phaeacia
Alcmaeon, a king of Argos and one of the Epigoni
Aleus, a king of Tegea
Amphiaraus (Ἀμφιάραος), a seer and king of Argos who participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt and the war of the Seven Against Thebes
Amphictyon (Ἀμφικτύων), a king of Athens
Amphion and Zethus, twin sons of Zeus and kings of Thebes, who constructed the city's walls
Amycus, son of Poseidon and king of the Bebryces
Anaxagoras (Ἀναξαγόρας), a king of Argos
Anchises (Αγχίσης), a king of Dardania and father of Aeneas
Arcesius, a king of Ithaca and father of Laertes
Argeus, a king of Argos
Assaracus, a king of Dardania
Asterion, a king of Crete
Athamas (Ἀθάμας), a king of Orchomenus
Atreus (Ἀτρεύς), a king of Mycenae and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus
Augeas (Αυγείας), a king of Elis
Autesion, a king of Thebes
Bias, a king of Argos
Busiris, a king of Egypt
Cadmus, founder-king of Thebes
Car, a king of Megara
Catreus, a king of Crete, prophesied to die at the hands of his own son
Cecrops, an autochthonous king of Athens
Ceisus, a king of Argos
Celeus, a king of Eleusis
Cephalus, a king of Phocis who accidentally killed his own wife
Cepheus, a king of Ethiopia
Cepheus, a king of Tegea and an Argonaut
Charnabon, a king of the Getae
Cinyras, a king of Cyprus and father of Adonis
Codrus, a king of Athens
Corinthus, founder-king of Corinth
Cranaus, a king of Athens
Creon, a king of Thebes, brother of Laius and uncle of Oedipus
Creon, a king of Corinth who was hospitable towards Jason and Medea
Cres, an early Cretan king
Cresphontes, a king of Messene and descendent of Heracles
Cretheus, founder-king of Iolcus
Criasus, a king of Argos
Cylarabes, a king of Argos
Cynortas, a king of Sparta
Cyzicus, king of the Dolionians, mistakenly killed by the Argonauts
Danaus, a king of Egypt and father of the Danaides
Dardanus, founder-king of Dardania, and son of Zeus and Electra
Deiphontes, a king of Argos
Demophon of Athens, a king of Athens
Diomedes, a king of Argos and hero of the Trojan War
Echemus, a king of Arcadia
Echetus, a king of Epirus
Eetion, a king of Cilician Thebe and father of Andromache
Electryon, a king of Tiryns and Mycenae; son of Perseus and Andromeda
Elephenor, a king of the Abantes of Euboea
Eleusis, eponym and king of Eleusis, Attica
Epaphus, a king of Egypt and founder of Memphis
Epopeus, a king of Sicyon
Erechtheus, a king of Athens
Erginus, a king of Minyean Orchomenus in Boeotia
Erichthonius, a king of Athens, born of Hephaestus' attempt to rape Athena
Eteocles, a king of Thebes and son of Oedipus; he and his brother Polynices killed each other
Eteocles, son of Andreus, a king of Orchomenus
Eurotas, a king of Sparta
Eurystheus, a king of Tiryns
Gelanor, a king of Argos
Haemus, a king of Thrace
Helenus, seer and twin brother of Cassandra, who later became king of Epirus
Hippothoön, a king of Eleusis
Hyrieus, a king of Boeotia
Ilus, founder-king of Troy
Ixion, a king of the Lapiths who attempted to rape Hera and was bound to a flaming wheel in Tartarus
Laërtes, father of Odysseus and king of the Cephallenians; he sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt
Laomedon, a king of Troy and father of Priam
Lycaon of Arcadia, a deceitful Arcadian king who was transformed by Zeus into a wolf
Lycurgus of Arcadia, a king of Arcadia
Lycurgus of Nemea, a king of Nemea
Makedon, a king of Macedon
Megareus of Onchestus, a king of Onchestus in Boeotia
Megareus of Thebes, a king of Thebes
Melampus, a legendary soothsayer and healer, and king of Argos
Melanthus, a king of Messenia
Memnon, a king of Ethiopia who fought on the side of Troy during the Trojan War
Menelaus, a king of Sparta and the husband of Helen
Menestheus, a king of Athens who fought on the side of the Greeks during the Trojan War
Midas, a king of Phrygia granted the power to turn anything to gold with a touch
Minos, a king of Crete; after his death, became one of the judges of the dead in the Underworld
Myles, a king of Laconia
Nestor, a king of Pylos who sailed with the Argonauts, participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt and fought with the Greek armies in the Trojan War
Nycteus, a king of Thebes
Odysseus, a hero and king of Ithaca whose adventures are the subject of Homer's Odyssey; he also played a key role during the Trojan War
Oebalus, a king of Sparta
Oedipus, a king of Thebes fated to kill his father and marry his mother
Oeneus, a king of Calydon
Oenomaus, a king of Pisa
Oenopion, a king of Chios
Ogygus, a king of Thebes
Oicles, a king of Argos
Oileus, a king of Locris
Orestes, a king of Argos and a son of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon; he killed his mother in revenge for her murder of his father
Oxyntes, a king of Athens
Pandion I, a king of Athens
Pandion II, a king of Athens
Peleus, king of the Myrmidons and father of Achilles; he sailed the with Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt
Pelias, a king of Iolcus and usurper of Aeson's rightful throne
Pelops, a king of Pisa and founder of the House of Atreus
Pentheus, a king of Thebes who banned the worship of Dionysus and was torn apart by Maenads
Perseus (Περσεύς), founder-king of Mycenae and slayer of the Gorgon Medusa
Phineas, a king of Thrace
Phlegyas, a king of the Lapiths
Phoenix, son of Agenor, founder-king of Phoenicia
Phoroneus, a king of Argos
Phyleus, a king of Elis
Pirithoös, king of the Lapiths and husband of Hippodamia, at whose wedding the Battle of Lapiths and Centaurs occurred
Pittheus, a king of Troezen and grandfather of Theseus
Polybus of Corinth, a king of Corinth
Polybus of Sicyon, a king of Sicyon and son of Hermes
Polybus of Thebes, a king of Thebes
Polynices, a king of Thebes and son of Oedipus; he and his brother Eteocles killed each other
Priam, king of Troy during the Trojan War
Proetus, a king of Argos and Tiryns
Pylades, a king of Phocis and friend of Orestes
Rhadamanthys, a king of Crete; after his death, he became a judge of the dead in the Underworld
Rhesus, a king of Thrace who sided with Troy in the Trojan War
Sarpedon, a king of Lycia and son of Zeus who fought on the side of the Greeks during the Trojan War
Sisyphus, a king of Thessaly who attempted to cheat death and was sentenced to an eternity of rolling a boulder up a hill, only to watch it roll back down
Sithon, a king of Thrace
Talaus, a king of Argos who sailed with the Argonauts
Tegyrios, a king of Thrace
Telamon, a king of Salamis and father of Ajax; he sailed with the Argonauts and participated in the Calydonian Boar hunt
Telephus, a king of Mysia and son of Heracles
Temenus, a king of Argos and descendent of Heracles
Teucer, founder-king of Salamis who fought alongside the Greeks in the Trojan War
Teutamides, a king of Larissa
Teuthras, a king of Mysia
Thersander, a king of Thebes and one of the Epigoni
Theseus, a king of Athens and slayer of the Minotaur
Thyestes, a king of Mycenae and brother of Atreus
Tisamenus, a king of Argos, Mycenae and Sparta
Tyndareus, a king of Sparta

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